Master Joiners: Timber windows making a comeback

Photo: Jose G Cano photography
Photo: Jose G Cano photography

BY HELEN ROSE

Sustainability is the name of the game these days, especially when it comes to timber windows. Many builders and home owners are opting for timber windows – and doors – made from renewable resources with low carbon footprints. The end result is they not only look good, they stand the test of time and have the added bonus of helping to protect our environment.

Add in the fact that timber has a high thermal resistance compared to other commonly used building products, leading Nelson Master Joiners secretary Philip Thompson to say that timber is a ‘win win’ decision. The high thermal resistance helps reduce heat losses and provides warmer homes with lower energy bills and no condensation on timber surfaces, which provides a healthier indoor environment, he says.

Longevity and versatility are also two good reasons for using sustainable timber. With proper maintenance the lifespan of windows and doors can extend to more than 100 years. Philip adds: “Timber windows and doors provide you with great design flexibility. As well as standard profiles, you can use customised window and door designs.  A myriad of paint options and colours exist for timber products, not to mention a huge choice of hardware fittings available to provide all manner of clients with the finished look they want.”

Quality workmanship is provided by New Zealand Master Joiners members who developed and tested their own Government-approved  profiles for the manufacture of wooden windows and doors. This came in response  to a 2010 edict by the Department of Building and Housing that the timber window industry produce and use windows that comply with NZS 4211 or there would be no guarantees they would be accepted in the future.

As a result, the NZS 4211 Compliant Timber Joinery programme was developed by a group of New Zealand Master Joiners who manufacture and certify timber doors and windows in compliance with the requirements of NZS 4211 for each of the wind zones in which the products are to be installed.

“This standard – NZS 4211 –  is no longer an option for the architect or client to decide. Now it’s a legal Government standard that is part of the NZ Building Code and all windows and doors must comply with it,” adds Philip.

What this means is home owners can opt for timber doors and windows, knowing they are sustainably produced, meet industry-set standards and look great.

Don’t just think Master Joiners only do timber windows; to see their other work go to the Nelson Marlborough Master Joiners Facebook page.